The Little Red Barn, Part 2

So our little red barn is now a little gray barn and is at about 99% completion.  We still have just a tiny bit of painting left to do, but the laborious, sweaty part is finished!

Let’s start where we left off last time, the builders had just finished the top, roof and lean-to.  We still had a ton of work to do:

  1. Build stairs
  2. Reface the entire front of the barn, because our contractor forgot to include that in his bid and we lost the quote
  3. Build two doors, which turned out to be one main door and a set of double doors
  4. Trim everything out
  5. Paint
  6. Re-adjust the weather vane, because it was installed with the directions pointing the wrong way.

Here’s a refresher photo of what it looked like when they left. The precious jewel in the doorway is our granddaughter!

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The first thing we tackled when they left were the stairs.  We purchased the side pieces at Lowes and attached them to a 2″ x 4″ that we leveled and secured to the barn under the door.  We used 2″ x 6″ planks for the stairs.  We didn’t have enough wood for the stairs, so we ran up to the recycle yard and grabbed the only pallet they had that had the right size wood slats.  It also had exactly the right number of pieces that we needed; and it was FREE!  God was guiding us with this project, that for sure!

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Next, we tackled the walls on the right-hand side of the barn.  We found out as we removed the wood that there were no studs to attach the wood to.  Previously, the walls had been built so they sat on a piece of wood that sat on the dirt.  Said piece of wood was thoroughly rotten, so the framework of the walls also had to be replaced.  A very nice worker at Home Depot explained how to move walls in a few inches so they would be off of the dirt, and install them so they would last another 100 years!  He drew out a picture and helped us gather all of the necessary supplies.  Unfortunately, when we pulled the walls down, we found another problem.  The main corner support that held up the right-hand corner of the roof was completely rotten. So, before we could tackle the walls, we had to replace it.

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Once that was fixed, we pulled the front boards off and started to move the walls in about 4″ off of the dirt and onto the concrete.  Since we had them down, we decided to widen the doorway to store some of our bigger tools inside.  The wider doorway makes it much easier to move them in and out when we need them.

After we finished the right hand side of the barn, we moved on to the center section to finish replacing the rotten wood there.  I had replaced the skirting prior to adding the stairs, so all we had to do was the middle section.  We ended up have to reframe these walls as well because they weren’t really framed to begin with.  There was just an angled board that didn’t provide enough surface area to attach the exterior boards.  So, we pulled everything down, including the lamps that had just been installed, and reframed these walls, as well.

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While David was building the walls, I was building our new door.  Turned out pretty nice.  We love it!  In the picture below, the glass still needed to be installed, but we were waiting to do that until everything was finished so we did accidentally break it.

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I also used a similar style for the double doors.  The sliding lock is made from a piece of 2″ x 4″ spray painted to match the rest of the hardware on the barn and two metal pieces that I found down by the wood.  Total cost for this was around $8.00!  When the mortgage company came to inspect the barn, she thought that it was an expensive metal door handle.  I laughed and told her that the insurance company didn’t give us enough money to waste on an expensive barn door handle!  I also ended up replacing the old hinges on the door above with hinges that matched the ones on the double door.

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David reinstalled the lamps, properly this time.  Apparently, the contractors didn’t use the correct installation hardware per code.  So now we are all electrically safe!

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Next, was to tackle trim and painting.

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The only thing left to do at this point was to add some boards to those wimpy 4″ x 4″s on the lean-to and paint them.  I also added a couple of decorative corbels on the side that will eventually be a little closed in yard.  LOL, I just noticed that there is still one tiny board that needed touch up paint and a piece of trim needs to be added.  Oops!

So here it is, before and after!

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And here’s a cute picture of the barn decorated for Christmas in the snow that we were so lucky to have the week prior!

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Happy New Year everyone!

Deanna

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